Health Writing

I’ve written about everything from the decline in child vaccination to medical marijuana laws, from overly ambitious global health campaigns to the opioid epidemic. Check out a few of my pieces below.

Gambling with America’s Health Pacific Standard. A growing movement of activists, academics, lawyers, and former gambling addicts argue gambling is not a personal, moral failing but a public health problem. They are challenging the ubiquity of legal gambling, saying that the proliferation of casinos, lotteries,  slot machines have, and online gaming have detrimental social, economic and health costs.

Shining a Light on Hidden Medical Research Pacific Standard. Many clinical trials of medical treatments —particularly negative ones—never make it to publication in academic journals, which can seriously skew the evidence doctors and patients use to make health decisions. This piece highlights a variety of governmental and non-governmental efforts to bring transparency to medical research.

Stark Consequences for Low-Income Patients in New York if Affordable Care Act is Repealed, Says Panel Department of Population Health website, NYU School of Medicine. Congressional staffer, Greater New York Hospital Association president, and healthcare leaders from NYU Langone and NYC Health+Hospitals share perspectives

By Creating a Trusted Place, a Pastor Helped Save the Lives of Black Men in NYC Department of Population Health website, NYU School of Medicine. Primary care physician's TedX shares the story of his colleague, a Brooklyn pastor, who reached over 20,000 black men in New York City to prevent colorectal cancer and showed how getting out of the doctor's office and into communities can be so effective.

Programs to Improve Diets May Miss a Cultural Ingredient Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. While public health efforts often focus on promoting healthier diets and improving access to grocery stores, they may miss their mark if they do not address a key ingredient: culture. One program in Columbia Heights, New York, suggests what this could look like. Spring 2015

‘Big Push’ Global Health Initiatives are Popular, But Do They Work? Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Aggressive global public health targets influence the agenda of many NGO and government organizations, but are these numbers-focused initiatives seeking too much too soon while imposing on low and middle income countries and diverting resources from their health systems? Spring 2014

Bringing ‘Consequentialism’ Back to Epidemiology Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Facing questions about epidemiology's relevance and a challenging funding environment, epidemiologists say they need to prove that they are still contributing to life-saving public health advances. Spring 2014

Spin Doctors? The Media, the Science, and the Hyping of Research Results Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Although scientists and journalists tend to portray theirs as an adversarial relationship—one in which the scientist’s quest for accuracy is at battle with the journalist’s quest for a story-both scientists and journalists have an interest in hyping positive results and downplaying negative ones, according to new research. Spring 2013

The Public Health Crisis of Sexualized Violence Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. At a conference, a group of academics, journalists, activists, and policymakers recommend that sex crimes be treated not as isolated events but as a global public health crisis that cuts across cultures and nations, and that demands the same intervention resources as any other public health issue.

Does Medical Marijuana Lead to Increased Use Among Teens? Two by Two, Department of Epidemiology magazineColumbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The U.S. has a long history of argument over the effects of legislation on social mores and behavior of teens. As states loosen up laws around marijuana use, a group of epidemiologists is examining whether there is cause for concern

Is an Unequal Society the Cause for Teen Depression and Suicide? Medium. Though it is uncommon in American society to link what we call “mental illness,” “mental health issues,” and “psychiatric disorders” with the way our society is organized, there are true psychosocial consequences of a highly competitive, individualistic society, and it may be more productive to focus on this than the biological causes of depression and anxiety.