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Be Careful What You Say about Water in Croatia

When I was walking home from dinner on the second night in Split, Croatia, with my two friends, the conversation turned to water. I was saying that the one thing we did well in America compared to European nations was providing tap water at dinner at no charge. 

Perhaps this is the kind of observation Americans like me use to reassure ourselves that it’s not all bad living in one of the most overworked and increasingly unequal of wealthy nations. Sure, if I lived in Denmark, I could have five to six-weeks of vacation time and get out of work at 4:35 p.m., but I’d have to pay for tap water at restaurants!! 

 Croatia, with its Plitvice lakes and ocean border, has no shortage of water.

Croatia, with its Plitvice lakes and ocean border, has no shortage of water.

After I made my comment, a man walked past us and said: “Croatia has the second-best tap water in the world!” As he walked ahead of us, I tried to redeem myself by calling out that I wasn't criticizing the water, just wishing I could have more of it.  But he was long gone.

After that, I did some research to find out if Croatia really had the number 2 best tap water in the world. It turned out it didn’t even make the top 10 list.